Flash Synchronization

Discussion in 'Phototechnical questions' started by Jackssv, Dec 28, 2003.

  1. Jackssv

    Jackssv Guest

    As a new Hassy user (500cm) I am a little confused about how to use the flash sync. Coming from a typical 35mm where shuter speed is set to 1/60 and f-stop is determined by flash settings, I am confused about how to set the shutter on the Hassy. Take for instance an f-stop of 5.6. How do I determine the proper shutter speed? Any help would make this a great day.
     
  2. gjames52

    gjames52 New Member

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    Jack:

    With a leaf shutter (Lens Shutter) you can select any shutter speed. Use your guide number to determine the required shutter speed/aperture combination for the distance you are shooting.

    Great shooting.

    Congratulations:

    Gilbert
     
  3. olenberger

    olenberger New Member

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    > As a new Hassy user (500cm) I am a little confused about how to use > the flash sync. Coming from a typical 35mm where shuter speed is set > to 1/60 and f-stop is determined by flash settings, I am confused > about how to set the shutter on the Hassy. Take for instance an f-stop > of 5.6. How do I determine the proper shutter speed? Any help would > make this a great day."

    Suppose you select a shutter speed of 1/60 sec. If the ambient light is low enough such that the chosen f-stop (based on, for ex&le, the guide number of the flash you are using) would result in a very underexposed image in the absence of flash, then the results using a flash would be essentially independant of shutter speed at shutter speeds of 1/60 sec and higher (up to 1/500 sec). This is because the the light that exposes the film is due almost entirely to the flash -- not ambient light -- and the duration of the flash is much shorter than even the highest shutter speed.

    If you are taking a picture of people outdoors, and the background is lit fairly well by ambient light but too far away for the flash to have any effect, then the lighting on the people will be determined by the flash (you set the f-stop according to the guide number), but the exposure of the background will depend on the shutter speed and the f-stop you have selected. In this case, select the shutter speed that will properly expose the background based on ambient light. Too fast, and the background will be too dark; too slow, and the background will be too light, but in either case, the people will be about the same. Experiment with over- and under-exposing the background by a stop. Fritz
     

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