Landscape lens for H3D

asalcedo

New Member
Sorry for asking a very basic question. I am new to Hassleblad.

I am getting an H3D 39 + 80 mm kit.

The 80mm should be good for studio and portraits. Is this correct or is it too wide for portraits?

What is the best lens for portraits?


For landscapes, what is the best lens?

In 35mm I would go for a 28mm maximum focal length.

Comparing the angle of view, the Hasselblad 50mm is equivalent to a 28mm in 35mm format.

Thus, I would settle for the Hasselblad Wide Angle 50mm f/3.5 HC Auto Focus Lens for H Cameras for landscapes.

Am I correct?

Thanks,


Antonio
 

fotografz

Active Member
Hi Antonio.

The H3D/39 has a 1.1X lens factor ... so a 80mm provides the field-of-view of a 88mm ... all of which provides a standard field-of-view like a 50mm does on a 35mm camera. This is fine for environmental portraits where the subject is part of a scene, but can distort a little when used up close and personal.

Hasselblad makes a 150/3.2 which makes for a very nice traditional portrait focal length.
There is a 120/4 Macro also, but it is much larger and razor sharp.

Finally, you may want to investigate the H/C zoom, to cover a bunch of focal lengths.

The wide angles are 28, 35 and 50 ... all of which are quite excellent once processed through Flexcolor using the DAC corrections. Just depends on how wide you want to go, and whether you will want to use film ( the 28mm doesn't cover full frame film shooting). The 50 is actually a 55, and I think produces about a 31mm in 35mm camera terms. The 35mm field of view is approx. a 26mm on a 35mm camera.
 

asalcedo

New Member
Thank you Marc again.

I just ordered the 150/3.2 that is the equivalent to my Canon 85mm which is indeed an ideal lens for portraits.

I have gone for the 50mm for landscape. It equates to 28mm on a 35mm camera, which for me is wide enough (for now).

I am now looking forward to put all this gear to work.

Kind regards,

Antonio
 

mark1958

New Member
>I am selling a mint 1.5 year old 35mm HC boxed and ready to go if >anyone is interested. It is a great lens but i decided on the 28mm >for the H3DII-31, which has a cropped sensor relative to the 39
 

antsyl

New Member
Hi Antonio.

The H3D/39 has a 1.1X lens factor ... so a 80mm provides the field-of-view of a 88mm ... all of which provides a standard field-of-view like a 50mm does on a 35mm camera. This is fine for environmental portraits where the subject is part of a scene, but can distort a little when used up close and personal.

Hasselblad makes a 150/3.2 which makes for a very nice traditional portrait focal length.
There is a 120/4 Macro also, but it is much larger and razor sharp.

Finally, you may want to investigate the H/C zoom, to cover a bunch of focal lengths.

The wide angles are 28, 35 and 50 ... all of which are quite excellent once processed through Flexcolor using the DAC corrections. Just depends on how wide you want to go, and whether you will want to use film ( the 28mm doesn't cover full frame film shooting). The 50 is actually a 55, and I think produces about a 31mm in 35mm camera terms. The 35mm field of view is approx. a 26mm on a 35mm camera.
Hello, you mentioned Flexcolor and DAC. Being new to Hassy digital, can you tell me what this is and how I can get it?
thanks
antsyl
 

Ed Bray

New Member
Flexcolor is one of the software programs available from (along with Phocus) which is available free from the Hasselblad website after registering.

Dac is the lens corrections availble with the programs to correct for any abnormalities or aberations from the use of a particular lens.
 
Top