To V system OR not to V system

thalmees

Member
Hi all
I noticed alot of old Hasselblad V system equipments was released recently in the show rooms of the Hasselblad dealer in my country.That was including the 2X Mutar teleconverter(Zeiss made)& the variable Extension Tube(64 - 85 mm)& alot of other old Accessories, Filters & Focusing Screens.This is UNUSUAL for a small dealer.
I read that as Hasselblad will(may be) discontinue the V system Soon or later.
Do you feel(or may be know) what I feel toward this issue??? I'm I correct or near correct???
I already(since 7 years) have invested in a big Hasselblad V system that include two camera bodies & four lenses with a lot of accessories. I'm afraid of this thought.
Thanks in advanse for any contripution.
 

colin

Member
Coincidentally, I was talking with the Hasselblad representative yesterday. He confirmed in an "unofficial" manner that we should expect to see the demise of the V system very soon. They are concentrating on the H2 (the H1 soon to be discontinued) and the Imacon backs. In other words, the digital arena.
With the recent demise of the 200 series, I think we all knew that the rest of the V system would keel over soon.
Zeiss will really have to find body manufacturers for their lenses!
 

wbulte

Active Member
Zeiss does a whole lot more than camera lenses, so I would not worry too much about their business. Had it been Hasselblad they depended on for their business they would have never grown to the size they are now. A short tour of http://www.zeiss.de will be enlightening in this context.

The fact that Hasselblad could not think of anything better than leave the V owners back in the dust when they did the H I can only think of as plain stupid.
 

jotloob

MFF-Patron
There has been a big fire this night in the galvanic department of ZEISS in Oberkochen causing a damage of many million €uro's
 

thalmees

Member
colin elliott (Colin) wrote:With the recent demise of the 200 series, I think we all knew that the rest of the V system would keel over soon.
colin
is it true that the 200 series is already stopped???
 

thalmees

Member
Thanks all. Colin, Jotloob, Simonpg, Wbulte, Jotloob, thank you all. Appreciate your input.
I think my worries was not free of valid reason.
But I(we) hope & prey for the continuation of the system that created & carried the concept of Medium Format.
 

floridarich

New Member
thalmees salsa (Thalmees)and all

It is no secret that digital cameras are being used heavily and photo finishing has diminished with the advent of digital cameras and printers.

Film cameras within a few years will moderate and slack off, try to find a film camera in retail stores.

Yet the quality of negative and large prints from Hasselblad is beyond reproach.

Let everyone sell their equipment, and let those who enjoy photography purchase all the used equipment, Hasselblad V's will never be out of style for use. They are classic.

In the short run prices will fall, but eventually used Hasselblad Vs will rise, as they are once again discovered.

If Hasselblad is dumping all their production into the market, with the intent of going out of the 'V's business, then so be it. Perhaps producing 'V's is a business loss leader

Look for lens and body bargains, enjoy

Richard
 

mahler_one

New Member
I'd agree Richard. Perhaps the 500 series cameras will acquire the cachet of the screw mount and older M series Leica cameras, i.e., a magnificent ex&le of a well made machine which does exactly what it was intended to do.
 

colin

Member
Production of 200 series cameras stopped some months ago. This was stated on Hasselblad's own website.
Yes,I'm well aware that Zeiss is more than lenses for Hasselblad bodies, however, Hasselblad has kept the name Zeiss in the public's eye. Rather like Rolls Royce,whose profits came from jet engines; the car merely kept the name in people's minds.
 

colin

Member
I believe Richard and Elliot are right. The continued success of the earlier Leica rangefinder bodies are due to the simplicity and precision of these all mechanical engineering wonders. The Hasselblad 500 series has established this same philosophy for a larger format.
 

bahngeist

New Member
When I read the first couple of messages this morning, the same points that Richard and Elliot made concerning the classic quality of the V series and the Leica rangefinders also came to mind. Whether specialist repair persons will be available 25 years down the road for 'Blads as they are for 60+ year old Leicas is, however, another story. One would hope so ... but then, that will depend on the availability of parts.

At present any unofficial statements re. an imminent cashiering of the V series by Hasselblad needs to be taken with a few (possibly many) grains of salt. Admittedly, the fact that 503 bodies are still being given away to fuel sales of the V96C digital back does suggest that Hasselblad may be clearing excess 503 inventory. That isn't an uncommon business practice in general, and doesn't necessarily preclude further production runs.

Conversely, given the 'Blad/Imacon merger, it is understandable that emphasis would be given to their digital products. Within that context, the continuation of the V series may well depend on just how well their V96C digital back has been selling. If corresponding sales have been soft, that may well be sufficient reason for Hasselblad to discontinue the V series. An even greater potential concern is that if V96C sales have been poor, Hasselblad may decide not to develop future digital backs for existing 5XX cameras. And if so, Hasselblad may be further disinclined to ensure a supply of V series parts apart from what would be sufficient to support its warranty obligations -- it wouldn't be in their best interest to support a platform that, by being able to accept alternate digital backs (e.g., Phase One), siphons sales away from the H series.

Of course that is all conjecture; my belief is that it would be premature to be overly concerned about Hasselblad not continuing their support of the V series. Though sales of film-based cameras have softened significantly in Europe and North America, this isn't necessarily the case in Asia. My understanding is that sales of V series cameras are strong in China, and in general the Chinese market for photographic materials is growing and remains fairly traditional -- one just has to look at the expanding choice of LF and speciality MF cameras coming out of China to realize that. I am fairly certain that Japanese companies -- especially Fuji -- are similarly aware, particularly since traditional film-based photography remains strong in their own domestic market despite the inroads made by digital imaging. Given its affiliation with Fuji, it it likely that Hasselblad is similarly aware that the global market for film will remain viable for some time to come.

For the sake of the V series, one just has to hope that Hasselblad did not cede the film-imaging market to Fuji as the price for their co-development of the H series. If one considers Fuji/Hasselblad as a conglomerate, they offer the most comprehensive range of general photographic materials and equipment available from any single manufacturing entity. Any overlaps in products have generally been smoothed-out by the discontinuation of redundant camera models. Fuji definitely is focused toward film -- to the point that it may well become, by default, the sole major manufacturer of photographic film. Hasselblad, in turn, provides complementary digital-imaging capabilities through its Imacon products. In fact, if it weren't for its acquisition of Imacon, Hasselblad's primary contribution to the partnership would be the cachet inherent to the classic respectibility of its name. If Hasselblad were solely on its own, it wouldn't make sense for it to continue the V series for that line no longer fits the direction the company has taken. Whether Fuji wishes the V series to continue may well depend upon whether the H series has come to be accepted, if ever possible, as sharing the pedigree of its predecessor despite the disassociation from Zeiss.

And that is the kicker: it may well be that for the H series to be accepted fully on its own merits, it may need to be disassociated from its predecessor. One way to do so would be for Hasselblad to bring the V series to a close; another way would be to subtly discrediting it by marketing the 503CW in an exorbitant manner similar to Leica's a-la-carte strategy
 

thalmees

Member
Floridarich, Mahler_one, Colin, Bahngeist,
grateful for your informative contriputions. Thanks too much.
Floridarich wrote: If Hasselblad is dumping all their production into the market, with the intent of going out of the 'V's business, then so be it. Perhaps producing 'V's is a business loss leader. Look for lens and body bargains, enjoy.
Floridarich, I've got it. Thanks for your clear visibility.
Colin, I could not find the anouncement in the Hasselblad web sit, may you kindly address it for me? Thanks.
Bahngeist, Thanks for the great analysis of the situation. I read it all, its indeed informative. Thanks a lot.
Thanks all collaegues.
 

qnu

Banned
Thalmees,

The decision to drop the 200-series was made early in 2004. There was no official announcement on their site. They just let the 200-series die gracefully, in silence.

Hasselblad/Imacon rather concentrate on the things that they hope will keep them in business.

There is another way to find out too: look if you can find 200-series cameras in their Products section.
 

tarashnat

New Member
> [I believe Dwdmguy wanted to discuss Aperture software to edit RAW > files, in which case Dwdmguy had posted to the wrong category. That should go in the Digital Darkroom category. Aperture is a new workflow software package for digital photographers. That I believe falls within the province of the category. Maybe Dwdmguy should have asked the question himself instead of pointing to a competing forum, but it would be difficult to discuss the release of a new product if one cannot link to its press release, etc. Is it invalid to include a link to the Hasselblad site when they release a new camera, lens, back, or other accessory? Those are by their nature commercial links.]
 

admin

Administrator
Hi Taras,

there is no problem at all with links to official announcements and in most cases also no problem with links to other forums, if it is the origin of the information i.e. a test from dpreview or the apple site with the product announcement or the official Hasselblad site etc.

But in this case of yesterday, it was an obvious try to make marketing for another site. There was no link to any official source like the Apple site for ex&le.

The commercial background was the company who stands behind that site, which is offering large format printing and this is the reason why they obviously started very recently a hassy forum.

Advertisng can be done with banners and they have to pay for it. This is only fair. This helps us to reduce our costs. Advertising - even paid one - is not allowed in forum postings.

We are very sensitive if someone tries to misuse our forums for advertising - commercial and non-commercial. Since this is a a mailing list, we have to pay attention to our reputation. Every posting gets to every user. Misuse means in this case spamming our users. This is why we are very strict with this.

We have had in the past many attempts of misusing our forums in this way. The bigger we grow, the more we face this....
 

thalmees

Member
Qnu wrote: The decision to drop the 200-series was made early in 2004. There was no official announcement on their site. They just let the 200-series die gracefully, in silence.

Hasselblad/Imacon rather concentrate on the things that they hope will keep them in business.

There is another way to find out too: look if you can find 200-series cameras in their Products section.
.
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Thanks Qnu, its clear. I did not notice that Hasselblad site is ometing the 200 series until you told me. Thanks.
 

jotloob

MFF-Patron
I can't remember , that HASSELBLAD or CARL ZEISS ever published , that one of their products will die in the near future . Thats why there are so many speculations and rumors all around . But after all , i can understand that behaviour . But there is also one thing for shure . The 500 serie is momentarily still on production , (i have this from a very serious source) but who knows for how long .
 
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